2018-19 COHSE IPL Fellows

Stuart Batterman:

Stuart Batterman

Stuart Batterman is a professor of environmental health sciences in the School of Public Health and professor of civil & environmental engineering in the College of Engineering at the University of Michigan. He has been engaged with research, teaching, and service in the occupational and environmental fields for over 35 years. He provides leadership as the center director of the NIOSH-supported Center for Occupational Health and Safety Engineering (COHSE), and as leader of the Exposure Assessment Core of the NIEHS-supported Michigan Center of Lifestage Exposures and Disease. His current research includes characterizing worker exposures associated with the disposal of e-waste; quantifying exposures of lead in drinking water and air pollutants associated with traffic; using health impact assessments to estimate impacts; exploring the influence of environmental factors on the onset and progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; and evaluating interventions aimed at improving environmental quality and student learning in schools.

Marjorie McCullagh:

Marjorie McCullagh

Marjorie McCullagh is Professor in the School of Nursing and serves as director in Center for Occupational Health and Safety Engineering (COHSE), collaborating with interdisciplinary faculty to prepare future occupational health professionals for roles in promoting the health of the nation’s workforce. Her NIH-funded program of research focuses on prevention of noise-related health problems among farm operators and farm youth. She is a registered nurse, a board-certified advanced public health nurse, and a certified occupational health nurse-specialist. She holds a PhD in nursing from the University of Michigan and has 20 years of professional experience in hearing conservation, including promotion of behavior change as it relates to use of hearing protection. Together with colleagues at the Center for Occupational Health, Safety, and Engineering, she plans to develop interprofessional education in the center’s academic programs.

Rick Neitzel:

Rick Neitzel

Rick Neitzel is an associate professor and associate chair of environmental health sciences at U-M School of Public Health. He has a PhD in environmental and occupational hygiene from the University of Washington, is a certified industrial hygienist and a Fellow of the American Industrial Hygiene Association, and is vice-chair of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value-Physical Agents Committee. His research interests include assessment of exposures to physical hazards and injury risk factors in workplaces and community settings, and evaluation of auditory and non-auditory effects of noise and heavy metals. He has studied occupational exposures and health outcomes among construction, manufacturing, and electronic waste recycling workers in the U.S., Thailand, Ghana, Chile, and Sweden. His research typically involves multidisciplinary teams with members from a variety of professions (e.g., medicine, engineering, audiology), and he incorporates interprofessional interactions into his courses wherever possible.

Marie O’Neill:

Maire O’Neill

Marie O’Neill is a professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. She has an MS in environmental health sciences a PhD in epidemiology. She has worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Pan American Health Organization, and in Mexico at the National Institute of Public Health and the National Center for Environmental Health. Her research interests include health effects of air pollution and temperature extremes; occupational safety and health, climate change and health; and environmental equity. Her research has been funded by the EPA, the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Science Foundation. Current work includes collaborating with Detroit community partners on a study of heat waves, housing and health, and a study of air pollution and birth outcomes among a cohort of pregnant women from Mexico City.